“THINK BIG. START SMALL. ACT NOW.”

From an article titled THE ALL-AROUND WISDOM OF “THINK BIG, START SMALL, ACT NOW”

“THINK BIG. START SMALL. ACT NOW.”

That statement has stuck with me.

It is a simple and logical idea, really. With whatever you want to achieve in life, you should aim high and remove any false ceilings. But you should also acknowledge that any path to “big” involves starting “small” — taking a series of steps to move you gradually closer to your end goal. And even those steps begin with some kind of action, so why wait to begin?

“Don’t pay interest on anything that loses value”

From a post titled Collection of the best advice I have received along the way …

  • Don’t pay interest on anything that loses value. Pay off your mortgage on a 15 year or shorter timetable. Pay off your credit cards monthly.
  • To become wealthy, make, save, and invest your money in assets that will appreciate. To be poor, spend your money.
  • Live below your means. Too many people spend money they haven’t earned, on things they don’t need, to impress people they don’t like.
  • Understand that even a bargain costs money. Only buy what you really need or will appreciate enough to justify its price.

Evaluate Your Life Each Day with One Basic Question: Did Today Matter?

Article titled Evaluate Your Life Each Day with One Basic Question: Did Today Matter? from lifehacker.com

She suggests that you ask yourself if today mattered in the grand scheme of things, every day:

…when you ask yourself this question, chances are you’ll know the answer intuitively. Did today matter? If so, great. Do more things like it tomorrow. Can’t remember anything in particular that made a difference? Well, better change it up.

It’s deceptively simple, yet one of the most important things you can ask.

“If You’re the Best One in the Room, You’re in the Wrong Room”

Article titled If You’re the Best One in the Room, You’re in the Wrong Room by Eric Ravenscraft from LifeHacker.com …

It feels good to be the best. You get recognition, a sense of accomplishment, and hopefully compensation. If you’re the best person in the room, though, you’re probably not getting challenged anymore.

Being the worst person in the room gives you motivation to get better so you’re not on the bottom anymore. However, being the top of your class probably means it’s time to move on to another class. No matter where you are, as long as you’re not afraid to challenge yourself, you can continue to improve and make yourself more valuable to the room.

If you want to be happy for a month, get married.

From a post titled Want To Be Really Happy? on Harvspot …

If you want to be happy for an hour, take a nap.
If you want to be happy for a day, go fishing.
If you want to be happy for a week, take a vacation.
If you want to be happy for a month, get married.
If you want to be happy for a year, win the lottery.
If you want to be happy for a lifetime, devote yourself to making other people happy

Be the person you needed when you were younger

From the site TISL Style

“Be the person you needed when you were younger” was one of the most thought-provoking ideas I’d ever come across.  It’s so obvious, so hopeful.  It’s beautiful if you think about it.

Trying to be more for others than you may have had yourself.  This isn’t easy because it requires the ability to be truthful with yourself; to be vulnerable and say, “Wow, I needed this in my life but didn’t get it.” And I’m referring more to fulfillment than material goods.  “Be the person you needed when you were younger” just speaks for itself.

There are going to be peaks and valleys. You don’t want to let kids quit during a valley.

Advice from research psychologist and MacArthur Foundation “genius” award winner Angela Duckworth in an article titled Grit Trumps Talent and IQ

“I believe kids should choose what they want to do, because it’s their life, but they have to choose something,” she says, “and they can’t quit in the middle unless there’s a really good reason.” There are going to be peaks and valleys. “You don’t want to let kids quit during a valley.”